The 4th World Conference on Women's Asylum and Resettlement in Taiwan spoke live about the significance of economic empowerment, not only in terms of "money" in substance, but also in giving women a "respected identity".

"Can economic empowerment of women prevent the continuation of gender-based violence?" 」

The 4th World Conference on Women's Asylum, invited human rights advocate Nina Smart, United Nations Foundation Initiative and Humanitarian Affairs Director Micah Spangler, gender equal rights and human rights fighter Faith Nafula Wafula, Liu Baijun, co-founder of the Taiwan Women's Baseball Advocates Association (TWBAA), discusses the key issue of the next step in the development of multiple equality and economic empowerment.


Photo: Live

Q1. Is the economic factor decisive in the occurrence of gender-based violence? When women are economically independent, may avoid the persistence of gender-based violence?

Nina Smart, who works to eliminate the Practice of Female Circumcision (FGM) in the Republic of Lions Hill, notes that

"What we need in the Republic of Lions Hill is to redefine what economic empowerment is. Because female circumcision is seen here as a business, a systematic business, but in reality it is a violation of human rights. Nina Smart

The form of female circumcision, which involves partial or total removal of a woman's genitalia (including the clitoris), may also be stitched up the vaginal mouth or piercing the clitoris, etc., and is usually performed by women. Behind the practice of female genital mutilation is discrimination against women and violations of human rights by means of sexual intimidation. Nina Smart also notes that "women can't leave a violent relationship because they have money." 」


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Gender Strength Encyclopedia

Female circumcision

Female genital

"Includes all procedures involving partial or total removal of female genitalia for non-medical reasons, or other harm to female genitalia." 」

Reference data: World Health Organization

Nafula also points out directly that economic empowerment does not necessarily address gender-based violence.

"We all acquiesced that when a woman is economically empowered, she can "stand up" for herself and she "can choose to leave." But the reality is that gender stereotypes are the cause of gender-based violence. 」


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She shares her own experience: "When women have the same economic power in the family as men, we see that gender-based violence doesn't stop happening. Even when women have the ability to speak for themselves, the perpetrators of the family may want to regain power and order in their homes through violence. (Recommended reading: Family court - domestic violence does not have the money to ask a lawyer, what other ways do I have? ) )

Liu bojun shares his experience of collaborating with the Reed Foundation, which provides opportunities for abused women to work at the Foundation through the customized design of the Employment Scheme. "Because in the past we have observed that more than 80% of women who leave the shelter will return in six months because they don't have enough money to survive. 」

"Through the design of the employment system, we want to do this not only to accompany the physical and mental rehabilitation and healing of survivors, but also to enable them to live the life they want to live." 」

Q2. Economic empowerment of women, have any success experience?

Micah mentions that we must economically empower women, especially young girls. He shared the United Nations Girl up programme and noted that in many countries girls did not have their own birth certificates and did not have the right to education that they deserved, which could lead to child marriage problems and negative cycles. (Same Show: The Cruel Truth about Five Child Marriages: Every Minute, 28 Underage Girls Are Forced to Marry)


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Wafula shares the importance of grassroots organizations in the Economic Empowerment FrontLine Initiative. "We have to look directly and ask what a woman needs most in her daily life. 」

Nina Smart points out that the significance of economic empowerment lies not only in the real "money" but also in having a "respected identity". She shared a story about a friend who had experienced female genital mutilation, and when she was a child she was unable to decide her own destiny, and when she grew up, she had the resources to join in the initiative to abolish the FGM and give the girls of the future a new destiny.

Liu said in good faith, "Rather than empowering these survivors, I feel that they empower us and make sense of our work." They were once recipients, and then they became givers. 」

She shared the story of one of the girls, an 18-year-old girl who was six months pregnant, thinking she was going to be a housewife forever, giving up what she wanted to do: "We encourage her to have a different future if she wanted to." So after the birth, she worked during the day and at night at the University, "she was happy to tell us that she was still qualified to pursue the happiness she wanted." 」


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Q3. Can microfinance be an effective method?

Micah noted that Nobel Peace Prize winner Muhammad Yunus was an important breakthrough in developing the theory and practice of "microfinance" and "microfinance" and the creation of the Bangladesh Village Bank. An opportunity can actually change life. "And the applicant will return and help others." 」

Nafula Wafula shares that micro-credit is a practical and land-based practice, with access to resources in Kenya, even in poor villages. Nina Smart mentions that microfinance is not just about women, it's also about inviting men to join. "They have the opportunity to apply and take responsibility together, which is a success story for us. 」

Mr Lau expects that in Taiwan we can take care of women who are traumatized by physical and mental trauma through more systematic financial collaboration.

The topic sits on the scene, the energy is abundant, the experience is intertwined, from the perspective of the United Nations, Africa and Taiwan, we see that economic empowerment will not be the only solution to end gender-based violence, and that the more important spiritual implication of economic empowerment is to let women jump out of the negative cycle of economic dependence, to regain strength from themselves, and to give her the respect she deserves.